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Guide on Different Type of Hammers
A wide range of Hammers are available, varying in shape, size and weight. The different styles reflect different uses. Around the house, the average DIY-er may only really need two or three types.

The shape of Hammer heads has not changed much over the years although some modern materials are now used in both the head and handle. Traditionally handle were made of wood fixed through a hole in the head; this allowed the handle to be easily replaced if required. Modern hammers use modern materials and the handles are often built into the head often with a form of built-in shock absorber to make them easier to use.
A  16 stanley hammer
One of the most popular hammer for general work, available with a wooden often hickory, glass-fibre or steel handle; with or without rubber grip.
A  16 claw hammer
The most popular weights are 455-680g (16 to 24oz). The claw is normally curved, and incorporates a 'V' cut-out to draw nails from timber. The claw can be used to lever up floorboards or where other places where a lever is required; care must be taken (especially with cheaper models) as the force applied can easily weaken the joint between the handle and the head.
Ball Point Hammer


A 16 ball type hammer

Normally used by engineers, the point is rounded and is usually used for shaping metal and closing rivets. Ball point hammers are available from 55 - 1100 (4 oz up to 2 lb.), 110 - 165g (8oz 12oz) are the most suitable for general use. Handles are normally wood, usually Ash or Hickory.
Lump Hammer


A16 Lump hammer

Described as a Lump Hammer, it has a double faced head, and is useful for light demolition work, driving steel chisels and masonry nails. As debris is likely to fly, the wearing of safety glasses and working gloves is recommended. Weight 1135g (2 1/2 lb) being best suited to domestic work. Handles are normally wood or steel, usually Hickory, or synthetic resin.
Sledge Hammer


Used for the heavier jobs, such as driving in stakes or to break up concrete, stone or masonry. For lighter jobs just the weight of the head may be used for blows, but for heavier work, the hammer is swung like an axe. Wear suitable protective clothing, including safety glasses. Weights 7, 10 and 14 lb.
Wooden Mallet


Used to drive chisels or to tap wood joints together, where a metal-faced hammer would cause damage or bruising. Note that the head is slightly tapered to ensure correct contact with the work. Both the handle and head are wood, usually Beech or Lignum Vitae.
Soft Faced Hammer


A 16 Hammer and nail

Various types are available, with hard and soft rubber, plastic or copper faces. Some come with a choice of faces which are interchangeable. The soft face hammer is useful for striking materials, such as chrome where a steel face hammer would cause damage. In some cases can replace a mallet for cabinet work.
Special Hammers


From here on, there are specialist hammers developed to meet the needs of various trades. These include a Brick Hammer for striking a bolster or splitting bricks; Woodcarving Mallet, with rounded body; Veneer Hammer, for pressing and tapping veneers into place; Upholsterer's hammer for driving tacks and nails in confined spaces, and Sprig Hammer, used by picture frame makers.
Nail Guns
More often referred to as 'powered nailers', these take the hard work out of fitting nails, staples etc. They are ideal where a large number of nails need to be fitted, such as fixing floorboards. They range from light duty (for use when fixing edge mouldings, picture frames etc) to heavy duty nailers, used to fix floorboards and garden decking etc.
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